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About us

The Oxford Parkinson's Disease Centre (OPDC) is a unique multidisciplinary research centre at the University of Oxford supported by Parkinson’s UK with funds from The Monument Trust, one of the Sainsbury Family Charitable Trusts.

Established in February 2010, the Oxford Parkinson’s Disease Centre (OPDC) brings together internationally-renowned scientists who work on the genetics of Parkinson’s, the generation of cell and animal models, and the wiring of brain circuits which control movement, with clinical experts in the diagnosis and treatment of Parkinson’s.

Our world-class research centre was formed to understand the earliest events in the development of Parkinson’s and create animal models with greater relevance to the disease, ultimately with a view to identifying the changes which occur before the symptoms become apparent.

Our programme targets the molecular pathways to Parkinson’s in order to:

  1. Understand the progression of Parkinson’s
  2. Predict the onset of Parkinson’s
  3. Identify potential drug targets for Parkinson’s
  4. Develop new treatments that will prevent the development of Parkinson’s in at-risk individuals.
  • Watch the video below to learn more about OPDC's research

 

Selected Publications

News

Pete Magill welcomes Lord O’Shaughnessy

Pete Magill welcomes Lord O’Shaughnessy

Posted 18/10/2018

The Medical Research Council Brain Network Dynamics Unit at the University of Oxford recently welcomed Lord James O’Shaughnessy, Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Health, for a site visit organised as part of The Royal Society’s Pairing Scheme that OPDC theme 3 co-lead Professor Pete Magill is taking part in. The visit began with Unit Group Leaders Peter Brown, Peter Magill and Tim Denison highlighting why, how and where the Unit ...


OPDC Smartphone app tests for early signs of Parkinson's

OPDC Smartphone app tests for early signs of Parkinson's

Posted 04/10/2018

Parkinson’s is the second most common neurodegenerative disease, the hallmarks of which include tremor, stiffness, and slowness of movement. Existing tests for the assessment of Parkinson's require in-clinic examination. This can sometimes cause a delay in diagnosis. It is believed that there are changes in the brain 5 to 10 years before the symptoms of Parkinson's become evident. To try and facilitate early diagnosis of Parkinson's, we at the ...


OPDC welcomes Participants to Open Day

OPDC welcomes Participants to Open Day

Posted 21/09/2018

On September 10th,  2018 over 200 members of Discovery cohort came to the Jury’s Inn, Oxford to hear about our latest research and share their views. We would like to thank all of the cohort members who came to the event from our centres across the country, and joined in the lively discussion session. Researchers from across OPDC’s themes shared their work. These included talks on our work to develop a new test for Parkinson’s, how we are using ...

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Seminars/Events

Mina Ryten 19 Nov 2018

Mina Ryten 19 Nov 2018

Posted 02/08/2018

Using transcriptomics to understand neurodegenerative disorders MRC Post-doctoral Fellow UCL Institute of Neurology As an MBPhD graduate (Cambridge University & University College London) and Academic Clinical Fellow in Neurology (London Deanery), I have been lucky enough to receive training in basic research as well as clinical medicine. I have thoroughly enjoyed both and am committed to pursuing a joint clinical and research career in ...

Sonja Scholz 12 Dec 2018

Sonja Scholz 12 Dec 2018

Posted 02/08/2018

Challenges and Opportunities of Translational Neurogenomics Dr. Scholz is a Neurologist and Neurogeneticist specialized in movement disorders. She received her medical degree from the Medical University Innsbruck, Austria. Following graduation, she was a post-doctoral fellow at the Laboratory of Neurogenetics (NIA) under the supervision of Drs. Andrew Singleton and John Hardy. She obtained a Ph.D. in Neurogenomics from the University ...

 

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